Dec 2019 Menu

Starter

Lentil and chestnut soup

Mushroom pate

Mains

Veggie Balti pie

Cranberry and lentil bake

Seasonal veg and walnut slice

Mushroom and spinach en croûte

Leek and potato pie with cheesy potato topping

Desert

Mulled fruit with homemade granola and coconut yogurt

Mince pies -our own mince pie filling (Vegan) and short crust pastry

Spiced orange and almond cake (GF)

Coffee or Tea

Prices

Three courses£10
Two courses£8

Nov 2019 Menu

Mains

Leek,cheese and potato pie topped with tomato and drizzle of truffle oil 

Harissa spiced vegetables and lentil casserole

Sri Lankan curry

Salads

Olive and sun dried tomato quinoa

Spelt with roasted beetroot, feta, chickpea and apple

Buckwheat tabbouleh

Cabbage, apple and carrot slaw with pecans and pomegranate

Breads

Homemade sourdough rolls

Desert

Courgette cake (vegan)

Prices

Main & two salads £6
Four salads as main £6
Slice of cake50p
Roll50p
Child’s bowl 50p

Blue Sky at the Abingdon Market of Excellence

Blue Sky Eco Cafe experimented  with a stall on the Abingdon Market of Excellence in July to raise money for, and awareness of, the social enterprise project. Sadly our nutritious and delicious breakfasts (porridge with quinoa, smoothies,granola with fruit compote, vegan french toast, bircher muesli) were a flop as all passersby had had their breakfast before leaving home! 

However our lunch menu of salads and Thai curry, roast aubergine and halloumi pittas, roast vegetable & coconut yogurt tzatziki were popular.

Maybe you will see us again???!

Sep 2019 Menu

Soup

Roast tomato & onion

Mains

Aubergine & lentil ragù

Crustless tomato and pepper tart

Mexican leek and black bean chilli

Farro with roast veg

Salads

Apple, beetroot, goats cheese and walnuts

Shaved pear &  fennel

Moroccan cauliflower with tahini sauce (optional)

Herb, bean and broccoli with caper & sultana dressing

Breads

Homemade sourdough rolls

Desert

Courgette cake (vegan)

Prices

Soup, bread & two salads £5
Main & two salads £6
Four salads as main £6
Slice of cake50p
Roll50p
Child’s bowl 50p

Farro

This ancient grain is beginning to gain recognition for its health benefits and ability to adapt to different recipes. In a similar vein as kamut, or bulgur wheat, farro makes a good alternative grain addition to several dishes.  It does contain gluten however. 

High in Fibre 

A very high level of fibre in farro makes it heart-healthy, good for digestion, and beneficial for preventing blood sugar or insulin spikes and dips 

Good Source of Protein  

High in B Vitamins 

Farro contains multiple B vitamins, especially vitamin B3 niacin, which is important for metabolic health and breaking down or converting carbohydrates, fats and proteins from the foods we eat into energy. 

Good Source of Antioxidants 

Most people think of vegetables or fruits as being the only high-antioxidant foods, but unprocessed grains also provide antioxidants. 

Provides Iron, Magnesium and Zinc 

 Iron is important for preventing anemia and helping to improve energy, while zinc is crucial for brain function, Magnesium has numerous benefits — preventing muscle cramps and PMS symptoms, helping you sleep better, helping with digestion — many people actually have a magnesium deficiency and don’t even realise it. 

Farro is a perfect addition to salads, stews, soups. Soak for 20 minutes, drain, cover with fresh cold water and bring to the boil. Simmer for 20 mins, or until tender. Drain well. 

Apr 2019 Menu

Soup £2

North African vegetable soup
spiced with cumin, coriander, sumac, turmeric and chilli flakes

Main and two salads £6

Mains

Pan fried vegetable galette (tart)
on a puff pastry (GF, Ve) base with artichoke puree and pumpkin seeds

Mushroom and roasted squash risotto
mushrooms & squash baked with Farro – more flavoursome than rice

Spaghetti Bolognaise
vegetables and puy type lentils in a rich red wine tomato sauce

Three bean chilli
served with tortilla chips

Salads

Warm kale, spelt & cranberry
with a lemon and Dijon mustard dressing

Black rice, piquillo peppers, walnuts and sultanas
tossed in orange juice and maple syrup

Spiced sweet potato
with peanut and date dressing

Roast beetroot & goat’s cheese
tossed in a spiced orange dressing

Bread 50p

Homemade sourdough

Gluten free bread

Desert £1

Organic Blueberry Muffins
made with Buckwheat & almond flour (GF,Ve)

  • Ve – vegan
  • GF – Gluten Free

Brussels Sprouts

“Brussels sprouts!” I hear you say, “who likes those!” and I felt exactly the same way. Either boiled or steamed I never liked them until …. I tried them roasted. Halved and tossed in a little oil and roasted either on their own or with other root veg and I discovered they were delicious!! Taste for yourselves in the salad dishes this month and then read about their health qualities!

In 75grams of cooked Brussels sprouts you get

  • Calories: 28
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Carbs: 6 grams
  • Fibre: 2 grams
  • Vitamin K: 137% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C: 81% of the RDI
  • Vitamin A: 12% of the RDI
  • Folate: 12% of the RDI
  • Manganese: 9% of the RDI

Brussels sprouts contain kaempferol, an antioxidant that may reduce cancer growth, decrease inflammation and promote heart health. They are high in vitamin K, a nutrient important for blood clotting and bone metabolism, and vitamin c

Brussels sprouts are a good source of ALA omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce inflammation, insulin resistance and cognitive decline

In short, Brussels sprouts are high in fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making them a nutritious addition to your diet.

Give them another try… roasted or raw, thinly sliced as an addition to salad.

Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that has been grown in Somerset since the start of the Iron Age. It has a unique gluten structure which makes it easier to digest than modern wheat.

It has a delicious nutty taste, not dissimilar to barley. High in protein and fibre, spelt is a good source of slow release energy. So much so, that the Roman army called it their marching grain.

Spelt in common with other nuts, grains and seeds, contains phytic acid, a unique natural substance which can impair the absorption of iron, zinc and calcium. Soaking the grain for several hours or overnight can reduce phytate content substantially.

According to Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, while pearled barley and spelt are “whole” in the sense of not being rolled, broken or ground down, they are not “wholegrains” but refined: the “pearling” that gives them their name is the process of polishing off the outer bran layer. Soaking is not necessary therefore.

Spelt can be used in soups, stews and salads. It also makes a delicious risotto.